A simple MATLAB program to show that High order interpolation is a bad idea


In a previous post, we talked about that higher order interpolation is a bad idea.

Runge's function

In this post I am showing you a MATLAB program that will allow you to experiment by changing the number of data points you choose, that is, the value of n (see the input highlighted in red in the code – this is the only line you want to change) and see for yourself why high order interpolation is a bad idea. Just, cut and paste the code below (or download it from http://www.eng.usf.edu/~kaw/download/runge.m) in the MATLAB editor and run it.

% Simulation : Higher Order Interpolation is a Bad Idea

% Language : Matlab r12
% Authors : Autar Kaw
% Last Revised : June 10 2008
% Abstract: In 1901, Carl Runge published his work on dangers of high order
% interpolation. He took a simple looking function f(x)=1/(1+25x^2) on
% the interval [-1,1]. He took points equidistantly spaced in [-1,1]
% and interpolated the points with polynomials. He found that as he
% took more points, the polynomials and the original curve differed
% even more considerably. Try n=5 and n=25
clc
clear all
clf

disp(‘In 1901, Carl Runge published his work on dangers of high order’)
disp(‘interpolation. He took a simple looking function f(x)=1/(1+25x^2) on’)
disp(‘the interval [-1,1]. He took points equidistantly spaced in [-1,1]’)
disp(‘and interpolated the points with a polynomial. He found that as he’)
disp(‘took more points, the polynomials and the original curve differed’)
disp(‘even more considerably. Try n=5 and n=15’)

%
% INPUT:
% Enter the following
% n= number of equidisant x points from -1 to +1
n=15;

% SOLUTION
disp(‘ ‘)
disp(‘SOLUTION’)
disp(‘Check out the plots to appreciate: High order interpolation is a bad idea’)
fprintf(‘\nNumber of data points used =%g’,n)
% h = equidisant spacing between points
h=2.0/(n-1);
syms xx
% generating n data points equally spaced along the x-axis
% First data point
x(1)=-1;
y(1)=subs(1/(1+25*xx^2),xx,-1);
% Other data points
for i=2:1:n
x(i)=x(i-1)+h;
y(i)=subs(1/(1+25*xx^2),xx,x(i));
end

% Generating the (n-1)th order polynomial from the n data points
p=polyfit(x,y,n-1);

% Generating the points on the polynomial for plotting
xpoly=-1:0.01:1;
ypoly=polyval(p,xpoly);

% Generating the points on the function itself for plotting
xfun=-1:0.01:1;
yfun=subs(1/(1+25*xx^2),xx,xfun);

% The classic plot
% Plotting the points
plot(x,y,’o’,’MarkerSize’,10)
hold on
% Plotting the polynomial curve
plot(xpoly,ypoly,’LineWidth’,3,’Color’,’Blue’)
hold on
% Plotting the origianl function
plot(xfun,yfun,’LineWidth’,3,’Color’,’Red’)
hold off
xlabel(‘x’)
ylabel(‘y’)
title(‘Runges Phenomena Revisited’)
legend(‘Data points’,’Polynomial Interpolant’,’Original Function’)
%***********************************************************************
disp(‘ ‘)
disp(‘ ‘)
disp(‘What you will find is that the polynomials diverge for’)
disp(‘0.726<|x|<1. If you started to choose same number of points ‘)
disp(‘but more of them close to -1 and +1, you would avoid such divergence. ‘)
disp(‘ ‘)
disp(‘However, there is no general rule to pick points for a general ‘)
disp(‘function so that this divergence is avoided; but some rules do exist for ‘)
disp(‘certian types of functions.’)

This post is brought to you by Holistic Numerical Methods: Numerical Methods for the STEM undergraduate at http://numericalmethods.eng.usf.edu

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Autar Kaw

Autar Kaw (http://autarkaw.com) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of South Florida. He has been at USF since 1987, the same year in which he received his Ph. D. in Engineering Mechanics from Clemson University. He is a recipient of the 2012 U.S. Professor of the Year Award. With major funding from NSF, he is the principal and managing contributor in developing the multiple award-winning online open courseware for an undergraduate course in Numerical Methods. The OpenCourseWare (nm.MathForCollege.com) annually receives 1,000,000+ page views, 1,000,000+ views of the YouTube audiovisual lectures, and 150,000+ page views at the NumericalMethodsGuy blog. His current research interests include engineering education research methods, adaptive learning, open courseware, massive open online courses, flipped classrooms, and learning strategies. He has written four textbooks and 80 refereed technical papers, and his opinion editorials have appeared in the St. Petersburg Times and Tampa Tribune.

2 thoughts on “A simple MATLAB program to show that High order interpolation is a bad idea”

  1. Thanks for the informative post. But you could’ve used publishing feature ti make this post likethey do at the mathworks website blogs…

    Like

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